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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 24 (225 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 9, Jean Paul Gaultier 5, Suzy Menkes 2, Jean Paul 2, Bill Letty 2, Madonna 2, Africa 2, San Francisco 2, Tom O'connor 1, Patrick 1, Tom 1, Dpw 1, Gabriela 1, Red 1, Womens 1, Bob 1, Naomi Kelly 1, Gaevend 1, Eglin 1, Mr. Jean Paul Gaultier 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    April 22, 2013
    2:44 - 3:13am PDT  

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to come up and say a few words. >> welcome and thank you for attending. station one is one of the biggest stations in the nation. running over 17,000 calls a year. on behalf of the station one, i would like to thank each one of you for your support in this project. we truly appreciate coming to work in an environment that is sporting our good health and safety. so ultimately we can support yours. we consider this community our community, our home away from home. i would like to assure you that we remain committed to continuing our primary mission. that is to protect the lives and property of the people we serve. thank you very much. >> and so you can find out a little bit more about this facility. i would now like to call up the principal architect
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responsible for this facility. bill letty. with stacy architect. >> thank you, chief. you know, a little known fact is that every architect wants to design a firehouse. not just because many of us wanted to be fire fighters at some point in our lives, it's because these are really iconic hybrid buildings that we feel -- embody a building that express dignity and security for our community. these are important
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facilities for our community. when we are working on this project in the office we often joke that firehouse no. 1 is like a block on steroids with really big machines in the garage. it's been a great experience for myself an my team to work on this project. of course, the board and staff of s f museum -- and bob, joy, and dave. the san francisco department of public works has been a true collaborator on this project and i would like to thank charles and gabriela. our team, of course webcor
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builders who made sure things happened and lineey oaks and lou, thanks, guys. and last but not least everyone at the san francisco fire department. we've government -- gone through a whole variety and great to assist a deputy chief who was an awesome partner during the early phase of this project and talking to the neighbors and trying to make sure the way it was paved for this project to really happen and of course deputy chief, kim lombardy to make sure we had all the details. i would like to point out to you that haven't noticed yet, there is a plaque to the right of the building that honors the fire
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fighters that have sacrificed their lives to the city for years. i would like to say with sincere hope today that they will serve for at least another hundred years. thanks very much. [ applause ] >> thank you. mr. letty. next i would like to introduce from webcor builders it's project director who spent a lot of time working with us on this project and that is mr. spencer reiner. thank you, chief. i would first like to congratulate and welcome the fire department to their new station. it's a wonderful neighborhood, hopefully we don't have to build another station for another 40 years. this was a great project for all of us to be involved with. it was definitely a team effort. bill
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letty, stacy, captain, kim lombardy and of course the other individuals at the fire department, charles at dpw, with that i would like to congratulate you with your new home and the best of luck. thank you. [ applause ] >> so we are pretty close, we are 3 minutes away from noon. without too much further delay, i do want to acknowledge a few more people, our city administrator, naomi kelly. [ applause ] as i would like to call it my partner in public safety, sir, thank you for being here. city engineer is with us. from the department of emergency management along with other people from the department of emergency management and i'm introducing all of these people because it wasn't just the fire
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department alone. it took a lot of work from the department of technology to the department of city planning, i saw brian strong here early and ken rich from the mayor's office. a whole host of people, and we have john green who is our department captain, who earlier this morning gave a very special blessing upstairs in the dining facility to all the members at station 1 and for blessing this building and all the work done here. few other folks that i would like to acknowledge, local 798, the men and women presented by tom o'connor behind me, thank you, tom. as well as some of his members of the executive board here, thanks very much to local 798. there is two retired
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deputies here. i have seen this happen. i'm grateful they came back because it's this early phase, he got us where we are at today. thank you very much. [ applause ] and also retired deputy chief of operation patrick guard who was a member of station one 1 gaevend us -- gave us a lot of input. most of my command staff is behind me. just like when you go out and run a call you count on each other as a team. i couldn't stand here doing what i do without the team behind me. i would like to acknowledge all the members from the team behind med -- me, the deputy chiefs. everyone. there is one person i would like to call out who
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crossed the finish line, assistant deputy chief, ken lombardy. [ cheering and applauding ] [ cheering and applauding ] >> we get the job done. thank you to everyone who came out. we have a few retired folks that are here. welcome, consider visiting us again. thank you for coming today and final thanks to the museum of modern art for your generosity and vision of getting us where we are today. now we'll do the ribbon cutting. there is one person i want to call up and introduce and appreciate her willing to do so. her name is sarah, her longest standing member of station 1. she's been in the department since 1987 and came to station 1 and been
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here since 1994. it's been a great pleasure to have her assist us with the ribbon cutting. take a look at the station and we will perform great work for you out of this station. thanks for your attention. 3, 2, 1. [ cheering and applauding ] [ cheering and applauding ] >> >> >> >>
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>> hi, thank you all for coming here today. i am the costume and textiles creator here at the fine arts museum. it is make great honor to introduce, to present this program today. just a few things come out of respect, photography is allowed, but no flash photography. we will be taking questions from the audience, and you can submit your questions either through twitter or e-mail, and we also handed out cards to you when you arrived.
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the questions will happen at the end of the program. if you are not planning to tweet or e-mail, please turn your cellphone off. again, it is my great honor to have this program and conversation between susie and jean paul gaultier. i feel very fortunate at the fine arts museum because in fact susie mencus' son lives in the bay area and she comes frequently to visit the family. it is always my favorite time of in the exhibition, when she comes and i get to walk through the exhibition with her. it is so learnful. i wanted to share that opportunity with the rest of the bay area. one of my favorites, during the laurent exhibition, one of my favorite moments is one suzy
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stopped in her tracks. she said, this is it, this is what is true of any great artist or any great designer. when they do something, it can be shocking and avant-garde, but years later, we stand and look at it and believe it has always existed. i think that this is true of jean paul gaultier's work. i know that have been friends for a very long time. it is my honor to introduce both suzy menkes, fashion editor of the international herald tribune, and mr. jean paul gaultier. [applause] >> the love seat. [laughter] i just want to know, can you hear me? please shout loudly if you cannot.
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[laughter] yes or no, you can hear? >> somebody said no. >> mic people, can i be heard? should i start? ok, good. so before i introduced one of the funniest, wittiest, most amusing and funkiest designers that i know, i would like to start with something a little bit more serious. you know, in fashion, the reason that people laughed seem obvious when you see the exhibition of all it's incredible glory and excitement. but at the same time, there were real reasons why designers laughed, and one of them, when it comes to jean paul gaultier, is probably what is talked about least. it is the technique, the skill, the handwork, the knowledge.
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sometimes it gets buried underneath the fantasies of the close. but if you look hard, particularly those of you are going to go to the exhibition afterwards, if you look on one side to see the incredible punk can-can clothes, while, exciting, a waterfall. then you look at the central lie all which is the per region and parts, you'll see the extraordinary crest -- kraft mentioned that can turn address and to have a jacket and half the skirt or can make a trench coat one of jean paul gaultier's iconic pieces and send it that is a trenchcoat but is also a pair of shorts. these kind of things, they're not tricks. their works of extraordinary skill. if you search in the exhibition, you will find that. you'll see the very early years that jean paul spend when he was learning paris couture. eglin said this young man looking very serious as he sits
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-- you will see this young man looking very serious as he sits and you will realize this is not a miracle. there was a solid basis. the other thing i want to say is that, you know, they're not many designers are around here changed the course of history. because when it comes to fashion, yes, there are lots of things that we see. lots of excitement, lots of fralala going on, but we do not often see things that you realize have captured the moment in time. and that is what i think you'll find in this exhibition. but i do not want to talk anymore, because those are actually some of the believes that you have come to listen to jean paul gaultier and not suzy menkes. [laughter] so jean paul, i really wanted to ask you, thinking we're going through the exhibition from the beginning, the power you give
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women with the sexuality with the corsets, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or
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maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra.
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a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to look at men to see that we are equals. after that, it was one that would then it can be as mature, strong or whatever, than a man. but we also see the attribute of imagery, of seduction, which was exactly what was into it in madonna. >> so we can all understand. when you saw madonna in her appointed course it, this was not the first time you had seen womens' underwear -- in her pointed corset, this was not the first emmy had seen women's underwear. you saw it with your grandmother and the work she did. isn't there a teddy bear in bastardi -- in the story? >> the teddy bear was there. [unintelligible]
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for a little boy, no, you cannot have a doll. you have to have a train. i was not traumatized by the train. maybe why do not drive. but also like a teddy bear. i cannot put it in a dress. i cut bras with newspaper or a magazine and would use pins to make that bra. to me, it was like the silhouettes as of may be on the tv. we saw a lot of movies. so i tried to reconstitute the body of a woman. and -- >> how old were you at this point? >> i think i was around -- i was
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around, i was a round -- the teddy bear, i got it at 3:00, but i let him free at that time at the three years old. i let him free. i think i was around five years old that i started to take care of him. first, very important, i was -- [unintelligible] seeing on my grandmother. she had white hair. so i was putting on the the bear a little color that was kind of blue. after that, i do not know why, but i said he has to change. so it was more red, which was a strong color, too. then i try to make it black. that did not work. the texture of the paintings, because i was putting paintings on him, did not go with it. so i had to destroy it and start again.
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blue, red, start again. all the make up was the makeup of my grandmother. you can see an exhibition a teddy bear. i should say that he is a little nice monster, but it is a little monster anyway. you know, i have some affinity with air. i'd love the air. i love to touch the air. >> i hope you like my hair, because of a drag queen's last night were trying to touch it. [laughter] >> for the moment, i am not yet a drag queen. but you can look at that photograph of me. thank you for the inspiration. [laughter] >> well we are joking about the corsets, you say it had a message. it was not showing the women in their undergarments for sexual reasons. it was to show their strong women. certainly madonna personified
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that. >> definitely. >> was it actually madonna in in 1990, the blond ambition tour, but this was not the first time you had done these bras. there was a link with africa. did i get that right? >> i did not get the thing with africa. >> i thought that when we see -- >> yes, yes, 1985. the first corset dress, i did a collection. collections were big. it was a mix of difficulty. and the lingerie. one part was the lingerie. i did it i think in 1981. i came out with the collection in 1982. of course, i was inspired by my grandmother. but something else. musical. i saw a musical in new york. something like about the life of
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fellini. they made a movie of it -- only a few years ago, which was not so good, but the play was excellent. it was broadway. there was one scene where all the women were preparing themselves for the show. all in corset, like satin, salmon color. and i was fascinated with it. i enjoyed the show, but i was only thinking about that, i must say. after that, there was the corset of my grandmother, and at that i have to do it, but it will be a dress. i did attend different dresses. long, shorter, even like a gym suit. i didn't like my souvenir of the one of my grandmother. and it was -- i did it like my and it was -- i did it like my souvenir of my grandmother.